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Don Inglish
Don Inglish
5 months ago

I support Law officers In general, but there are some that shiuldnt be.

Dave
Dave
5 months ago

I understand your dismay. As our society becomes more polarized, police officers are going to be put in these kinds of positions more and more often. Although in principle, I agree that it would be nice to see police officers disobey more often, we are working in a grey area here. In all probability, if an officer did refuse to obey, they would lose their carrier. We have already seen this with officers that have been fired for simply posting things on social media. We are all confronted with things at some point in our carriers when we have to weigh the consequences of giving up that carrier against going against our personal beliefs. I use the word belief here, because these things are in that grey zone of is it lawful vs. how we think or feel about something, not necessarily what is factual. In the example of the Louden county school board meeting, although my sympathies lie 100% with the parents and the guy you showed being arrested, what the officers did may very well have been lawful. The reason those parents were there and how passinate they were about the subject at hand has nothing to do with what is lawful as far as what the officers did. In a lot of these kinds of situations, the perspective of the police officer is and should be “tell it to the judge”. A judge might very well rule that the school board acted improperly (or not). It’s not the place of officers to make those kinds of determinations in on the spot situations. A police officers job is to maintain order, and the school board was the closest thing to an authority on the spot. Also, don’t put this on the rank and file. It’s the captain’s and chief’s and mayor’s that need to be held to this kind of standard. (Besides, we did see a mass resignation recently in Portland and police have been retiring and quiting in far greater numbers than usual lately. And besides besides, as policemen quit, get fired etc. the left still gets what they want by them leaving; and guess what the leftists will put in their place; same thing starting to happen in the military.)

David Emerson
David Emerson
5 months ago

I think the rank and file are in a very tough position. They are sworn to follow the orders of those in auithority over them, but are also supposed to resist clearly unlawful orders. In the grey areas when they are unsure they mostly say tell it to the judge as they should. Most times they have little choice but to follow orders or resign and leaving a well paying career with often years of training and seniority at stake is an impossible choice.
I think that, unfortunatly, many of those who are making this choice will be replaced with mindless storm troopers. I hope I am wrong.
GOD bless US and GOD Save the USA.

Nancy Stefanski
Nancy Stefanski
5 months ago
Reply to  David Emerson

23-year retired veteran of the police force here. I was not “sworn to follow the orders of those in authority over [me]”. I was sworn to enforce the law and the Constitution. I was not very popular, though, because there were many occasions where I took a stand against an order I believed unlawful. It was a very rocky career. I was never promoted, but I can, at least, live with myself, and, at best, be proud of the job I did. In addition, there being only so much time in the day (mostly because of all the BS-CYA paperwork, and the classroom “training” sessions) I never found the time to write a seat belt ticket…wink wink.

I often found myself at odds with my co-workers on policy and even union issues, but I also found a way to navigate with respect. But, again, I was NOT a popular person because of it. I wonder, at this time, how far the Left would get with this movement (Defund, COVID, CRT) if people were willing to be ‘unpopular’. Is popularity more powerful than money? I could argue that it is why we desire money. Just sayin’…